Analysis of Safeguarding Policy and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct

Analysis of Safeguarding Policy and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct

This article is an analysis of safeguarding policy and midwifery council code of conduct. Study it to gain knowledge that you can use to create excellent educational essays.

Introduction to Analysis of Safeguarding Policy and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct Article

I will examine both the Safeguarding policy and the Nursing and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct in this post. This essay will discuss both the policy and the code, how they benefit health professionals, and why having the policy and the code as a student nurse is crucial. I’ll look at the safeguarding policy and how it’s been presented, as well as why it exists and what other organizations contribute to promote it.

I’ll look at the NMC code of conduct and how it was presented, as well as how it provides support and direction to health professionals. I’ll talk about three clinical concerns I’ve discovered while on placement, as well as how the incident happened and how it impacted me, the patient, and the other people involved. I’ll talk about how the event has been influenced by safeguarding and whether or not safeguarding has been involved.

I’ll be writing a reflective account for each of the three clinical problems. I’ll be working with the Gibbs module. I picked the Gibbs module because I wanted to incorporate my feelings about the incident, and I thought Gibbs did so better than other modules (O’Regan, S. Nestle, D. 2015).

Section 1: Safeguarding policy, 2015.

What is the purpose of the safeguarding policy, 2015?

In this part, I’ll look at the implications of the safeguarding policy (NHS England, 2015) and how it influenced my work. When working in the health care field, it’s critical to stay current on new rules and to read the most recent ones. Policies must also be up to date since they provide healthcare workers with step-by-step guidance on what to do if they find themselves in a position where their patient is in danger, whether at home, in a hospital, or in a care facility. When a current policy is used, the patient will get the finest possible treatment.

NHS England has implemented a safeguarding strategy to protect children, young people, and adults in the care of health professionals (Papanikitas, 2013). The policy has been implemented to guarantee that all patients, regardless of their age, are treated equitably and get high-quality treatment. Respect for their human rights and well-being, as well as freedom from abuse and neglect (Nursing in practice, 2016).

To avoid a situation in which a patient is harmed or insulted, safeguards have been put in place. All health professionals, including Medical Directors of Nursing, NHS England Regional Directors, NHS England Area Directors, Directors of Human Resources, and General Practitioners (GP), are covered under the NHS’s safeguarding policy (King’s College Hospital, 2018). The policy is given in a tidy and well-structured manner. The policy’s material is informative, simple to comprehend, and contains all necessary information. The contents page is well laid up.

The most crucial reason for safeguarding is that protecting patients from damage and abuse is critical in any circumstance where a health professional is present. Patients who are being neglected or abused will continue to be neglected or abused if nurses do not whistleblow (A whistle-blower is a person who exposes any kind of information or activity that is considered illegal, unethical, or not correct within an organization that is either private or public) (Lewis, P. Goodman, S. 2007).

When it comes to protecting a patient, a nurse must know how to communicate, when it is okay to speak out, and who to call. For example, if a patient is being mistreated in the hospital, the nurse may whistle to a ward manager’s sister. It’s not always simple to recognize the indicators of someone being mistreated. Practice nurses, on the other hand, have an advantage since they are educated to recognize warning signs and escalate them appropriately (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, 2016).

The primary audience for this policy is health care professionals; however, the policy may also be used to provide information to family and/or friends. By providing this information, the family can better understand what will happen next when someone has been abused or neglected.

The safeguarding policy is in place to assist health professionals in their decision-making and to guide them in a safe route when necessary. The policy explains how to deal with instances in which a health practitioner is unclear. The policy I used was first published in March 2014, and it was last modified in June 2015. (Nursing in practice. 2016).

Most policies are revised annually or every other year, and this policy is ready for an update to provide health professionals with additional information and direction. When a health care provider is caring for a patient who is neglected or mistreated, The MCA (2015) established a legal framework to provide protection to people who lack the capacity to make their own choices.

In this sort of scenario, decisions should be taken by the person’s next of kin or a person who is closest to the person and has the person’s best interests at heart. Health practitioners must listen to patients who have the capacity to make decisions and respect their choices, which may occasionally lead to current issues (Nursing in practice, 2016).

Section 2: Three Clinical Issues.

Number one – bed sores for patients on hourly turns.

The first concern I’ll address is about a patient named Betty Smith, an 89-year-old woman with dementia and arthritis who will be known as Betty Smith for confidentiality reasons imposed by the nursing and midwifery council. Betty Smith was brought to the hospital because she was feeling poorly and confused. While in the hospital, Betty Smith developed grade one-bed sores on her back near the bottom of her spine (Hampton, S. Collins, F. (2004). To ease the strain on Betty Smith’s back, the nurse caring for her decided to put her on two hourly turns.

Not all of Betty’s turns had been completed, and some of the ward personnel had been incorrectly charting her turns. Betty’s grade one bedsore began to deteriorate and became a grade three sore, her skin torn and fractured, since not all of her shifts were completed. When I finished my shifts for Betty, I put cream and barrier spray on her sore and made sure she was as comfortable as possible in bed (Hampton, S. Collins, F. (2004).

When I returned to work with Betty Smith after three days, I saw her bedsore had worsened to the point where the skin surrounding the sore had perished and the bone was beginning to show. A grade one sore was located farther down her back towards the bottom. I recorded a new sore and how much the other sore had become gradually worse after administering cream and spray to both wounds, after turning Betty and making her comfortable.

I immediately informed the ward’s sister, who examined Betty’s wounds and filled up a document detailing what had occurred. When Betty’s family arrived, the sister described what had occurred and why the skin had become so injured. Betty Smith’s skin became much better and continued to mend over the next five days till she went home.

Betty’s skin got damaged and uncomfortable as a result of health personnel not properly caring for her by merely noting a turn. I’m not sure what shape Betty would have been in when she returned home if it hadn’t been up to the sister. Betty’s skin issue is not the only one that has been harmed in the healthcare industry; regrettably, many other people have been in similar situations, although not all of the consequences have been the same as Betty’s. I didn’t know the members of staff who hadn’t turned Betty in the scenario I was in, but I knew the sores had become much worse. It’s critical to act immediately to protect patients in Betty’s situation so that no more harm is done.

My feelings regarding the scenario were guilt, wrath, sadness, and overall pain at the thought that a health practitioner could do such a thing to a person. Betty had already had enough suffering as a result of her arthritis and dementia, so why should she have to endure the misery of a grade five bedsore when it might have been avoided? As a result of the circumstances, the ward was hauled to court, and charges were filed against him.

Number two – One to one patient falling due to low staffing.

The second topic I’ll address is about three separate patients who will be referred to as Harry Smith, Bart Smith, and David Smith for confidentiality reasons imposed by the nursing and midwifery council.

Harry Smith is a 68-year-old man with delirium and lung illness. Harry was taken to the hospital after a fall at home with no witnesses, and he has no recollection of how long he was on the floor.

Bart Smith, 75, is a dementia patient with a shattered hip. Bart was sent to the hospital because he was getting more confused.

David Smith is a 70-year-old man suffering from delirium and dementia. David was discovered unconscious on the floor at home and was sent to the hospital for a suspected fall.

In a local hospital, Harry, Bart, and David are all in the same bay; all three men are one-to-one patients, which means that a member of staff must keep an eye on them at all times in case of an accident (Cristian, 2012). It was a hectic day at the hospital, busier than usual, with a full ward and little staffing owing to sickness. I was a one-to-one patient caring for an old woman who was also confused.

Because of the limited personnel, Harry, Bart, and David were not constantly observed, but there was always someone on the job. Bart and David continued attempting to get out of bed or out of the chair by themselves in the morning. Bard, who has a shattered hip, is unable to walk without agony as a result of this. While the crew tried their best to look after the three guys, they were so busy that they didn’t have time to gather their thoughts or to look after them.

I was called to look after Harry, Bart, and David in the afternoon. I maintained a tight check on them while in the bay and completed all tasks that were required, such as observations of all patients, care records, fluid balance charts, and basic bay cleaning. I was allowed to leave the bay when my family was visiting. I had my tea while out on the water, and when I returned, the family had departed, leaving Harry, Bart, and David alone, and everyone seemed anxious.

David had been incontinent, I learned. I requested that other members of staff aid me in cleaning David and making him more comfortable, as well as keeping an eye on Harry and Bart. I heard a huge crash in the bay while I and another health professional were caring for David, and when I turned around, Bart was laying on the floor with spilled water close to him. I yelled for assistance, and the personnel had already arrived to assist.

Fortunately, David had been cleaned by me and the health professional, and he was back in his comfortable chair. Bart was in a lot of agony as I helped the other nurses with him since he had slid on the water and fallen onto his hip. After assessing Bart and deciding on the best course of action, the nurses moved him to a bed and obtained an emergency X-ray. After it was determined that Bart’s hip had not been damaged, he was prescribed pain medicine.

My mood in the afternoon was tired, but I felt really confident. Throughout the scenario, I felt as though I had failed Bart and that it was my responsibility. Later, I learned that an accident occurred in a separate bay, requiring the member of staff to assist another health professional and patient.

I expressed my feelings to one of the health professionals, and although I felt terrible in some ways, the health professional reassured me that it wasn’t anyone’s fault; these things happen when there aren’t enough personnel, and we can’t care for one patient when the bays are full.

As a result of the circumstance, Bart’s family filed a complaint alleging safeguarding violations. Low staffing is a widespread issue in many trusts, and it is regrettably a problem that is not always fixable (By Committee on the Adequacy of Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes, Institute of Medicine, 1996).

Number three – Low communication leading to mistakes in medication.

The third concern I’ll describe is about a patient named Tom Smith, a 35-year-old male with a history of urinary tract infections, who will be identified as Tom Smith for confidentiality reasons imposed by the nursing and midwifery council. Tom was brought to the hospital with a UTI and disorientation, and while on the ward, he underwent a CT scan of his kidney since antibiotics weren’t working and health specialists on the ward suspected kidney stones. The findings of a CT scan for kidney stones were negative.

Tom was subsequently placed on an antibiotic that was more potent. Tom was given a stronger antibiotic called amoxicillin, which was prescribed by the physicians, while a health professional was conducting medication rounds on the ward. A few hours after taking amoxicillin, Tom started to break out in a rash all over his body. The nurses were baffled as to why this was occurring.

When a health professional asked the doctor to give an antidote for the rash, the doctor realized she had made a mistake. Tom has a penicillin allergy, and amoxicillin contains penicillin. Tom was experiencing an adverse response to the drugs, causing him to be in even greater discomfort. Following a staff meeting with all of the parties involved, including the sister and the ward manager. It was concluded that the doctor was to blame for not double-checking Tom’s allergies and that the nurse was to blame for not paying attention to Tom’s allergies.

Analysis of Safeguarding Policy and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct
An instance of Poor Nurse-Doctor Communication

As a result of the allergic response, Tom ended up spending more time in the hospital. “It was a mistake; the nurses are only human,” Tom stated to me, neither outraged nor irritated over the incident. Tom brought up an excellent point: the doctor and nurse made a mistake. The doctor, rather than the nurse, is to blame in my view since the nurse should have checked Tom’s records to see whether he had any allergies.

The nurse, on the other hand, is required by law to inquire about the patient’s allergies. My reaction to the occurrence was that I was perplexed as to why Tom did not tell the nurse about his allergies, and why the nurse did not check Tom’s allergies on his card or Tom’s information on the computer. In terms of safeguarding, Tom was not protected from danger, and safeguarding was not up to the task of protecting a person from injury and neglect. Tom was not treated the same as other patients; his information was not reviewed to ensure that employees were aware of his sensitivities.

Section three – an analysis of the NMC code

What is the purpose of the NMC code of conduct?

In this part, I’ll look at the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s (NMC) code of conduct, as well as how and why it was created. I’ll talk about how the NMC code has affected health professionals and how it will continue to aid them throughout their careers, whether they’re students, newly certified, or have been practicing for a while. I’ll talk about how the NMC code is written, such as if it’s written for professionals, makes sense, reads well, and is overall a useful reference. Or if the code is poorly written, for example, if it is written in a manner that is difficult to comprehend, cramped, or otherwise ineffective. I’ll figure out who the NMC is supposed to benefit and why.

Analysis of Safeguarding Policy and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct
The NMC Code of Conduct.

The NMC code of conduct was established to protect patient safety and ensure high-quality treatment (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2018). The National Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) has established a code of conduct to provide advice and assistance to nurses, midwives, and other health professionals. Members of the public, as well as health professionals, may use the report to get information and assistance.

The code was initially published on January 29, 2015, and it went into effect on March 31, 2015. On the 10th of October 2018, the report was updated with fresh material as well as any new or updated legislation (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2015). Since the implementation of the NMC code, there have been incidents in which nursing professionals have failed to meet the NMC criteria.

The Francis report, 2015 (The Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry, 2013), was the primary event that occurred as a result of the events that occurred at the mid-Staffordshire hospital. Following this incident, the NMC modified the code of conduct to reflect a higher quality of care, as well as the potential consequences if these standards are not fulfilled.

Nurses and midwives may utilize The NMC code to encourage safe and effective practice in their workplace, which might include hospitals, patients’ homes, care homes, and other settings. The NMC has issued many instructions within the code to ensure that health professionals are aware of how to execute a job. The principles include topics such as maintaining a person’s dignity, listening to individuals and responding to their concerns and preferences, acting in the best interests of patients, maintaining confidentiality in the workplace, and more.

The NMC has included legal counsel and assistance in the code. If an event occurs, the code provides help and guidance. The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) provides assistance and advice to all health professionals (2019).

Conclusion

Overall, the Safeguarding policy and the Nursing and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct have been examined in this article. This essay has given information on both the policy and the code, how they assist health workers, and why it is critical for a student nurse to know both. I looked at the safeguarding policy and how it was presented, as well as why it exists and what other organizations contribute to promote safeguarding.

I looked at the NMC code of conduct and how it was presented, as well as how it provides assistance and direction to health professionals. I’ve detailed three clinical concerns that I’ve discovered while on placement, as well as how the incident happened and how it impacted myself, the patient, and the other staff members involved.

Reference list

  • By Committee on the Adequacy of Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes, Institute of Medicine (1996). Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes. 2nd ed. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. p149-155.
  • Cristian, A (2012). Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics. Pennsylvania: W.B. Saunders Company Ltd. p.265-266.
  • Hampton, S. Collins, F. (2004). Tissue Viability. Philadelphia: Whurr Publishers Ltd. p62-63.
  • King’s college hospital. (2018). safeguarding adults. Available: https://www.kch.nhs.uk/about/corporate/care-standards/safeguarding-patients/adults  Last accessed 2/6/2019.
  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. (2016). Domestic violence and abuse. Available: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/qs116. Last accessed 16/6.2019.
  • Nursing in practice. (2016). Safeguarding vulnerable adults. Available: https://www.nursinginpractice.com/article/safeguarding-vulnerable-adults. Last accessed 2/6/2019.
  • Nursing and Midwifery Council. (2018). The revised NMC Code. Available: https://www.nmc.org.uk/globalassets/sitedocuments/nmc-publications/the-revised-nmc-code-frequently-asked-questions-faqs.pdf. Last accessed 16/6/2019
  • Nursing and Midwifery Council. (2015). The Code, p2.
  • The Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry. (2013). Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust public inquiry. not this. 1 (not this), p7
  • NHS England (2015). Safeguarding Policy. London: NHS England. p9-13.
  • Nursing and Midwifery Council. (2019). We are the nursing and midwifery regulator for England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. Available: https://www.nmc.org.uk/. Last accessed 18/6/2019
  • O’Regan, S. Nestle, D. (2015). clinical Simulation in Nursing. reflective Practice and Its Role in Simulation. 11 (8), p3-5
  • (Papanikitas, A (2013). Medical Ethics and Sociology. 2nd ed. London: Elsevier Inc. p112-113
  • Lewis, P. Goodman, S (2007). Management, Challengers for tomorrow’s leaders. 5th ed. United States of America: Thomson Learning, inc. p75-77.
  • Nursing in practice. (2016). Safeguarding vulnerable adults. Available: https://www.nursinginpractice.com/article/safeguarding-vulnerable-adults. Last accessed 18/6/2019.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. Who can be the whistleblower?

(A whistle-blower is a person who exposes any kind of information or activity that is considered illegal, unethical, or not correct within an organization that is either private or public)

2. What is the aim of safeguarding policy?

The safeguarding policy is in place to assist health professionals in their decision-making and to guide them in a safe route when necessary. The policy explains how to deal with instances in which a health practitioner is unclear.

3. What is the function and purpose of the NMC Code 2018?

The NMC code of conduct was established to protect patient safety and ensure high-quality treatment (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2018).

 

Analysis of Safeguarding Policy and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct

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