Identifying the Roles and Responsibilities of a Midwife; The Role of the Midwife in the Pre-conceptual State and The Role of the Midwife in the Antenatal State.

Identifying the Roles and Responsibilities of a Midwife

This essay is focused on identifying the roles and responsibilities of a midwife. Study it to gain insights that you can adopt when writing articles on the roles of a midwife.

Introduction to Identifying the Roles and Responsibilities of a Midwife Essay

The goal of this project is to determine the functions and responsibilities of a midwife. It will cover how a midwife may help both before and after conception, as well as throughout prenatal time. It will also demonstrate what women should expect from their prenatal care and how their midwives’ interpersonal skills and attitudes may influence women’s pregnancy experiences, as well as the value of antenatal education and midwives’ responsibilities in delivering it. It will not just concentrate on the physical functions of midwives, but also on their emotional roles. It will also identify the information that the midwife will need to gather from a booking history.

According to the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 10-20% of known pregnancies end in spontaneous abortions (RCOG 2006). This number alone emphasizes the significance of midwives’ duties in the preconception and prenatal periods, which are basically equal to those in the intrapartum and postpartum periods.

Pre-conceptual support and counseling should be offered for all women planning to have children who have pre-existing medical issues, whether they be physical or psychological illnesses that might be worse by pregnancy (CEMACH 2007). Preconceptionally, the midwife’s responsibility is to ensure that both parents are in the best physical and mental condition to manage pregnancy safely and cheerfully (Wallace and Hurwitz 1998 PG 3).

The Role of the Midwife in the Pre-conceptual State

The pre-conception job of the midwife is to acquire history from the prospective parents and evaluate whether any difficulties might impair a woman’s or couple’s reproductive health. They may also evaluate the holistic variables that might influence a pregnancy. When required, the midwife should provide guidance; however, this must be done with respect to the requirements of the person (Henderson and Macdonald 2004).

During an initial assessment, a Midwife must consider a variety of health factors, including pre-existing medical illnesses, the environment and lifestyle of the mother, and maternal body weight, which should be between 19.8 and 26 for best fertility and pregnancy outcomes (Fraser and Cooper 2009). It is the role of the midwife to provide nutritional advice to pregnant women, such as eating 5 portions of fruits and vegetables per day, eating more starchy foods and less fat, increasing folic acid and folate intake, and lowering caffeine intake (Ramsay 2006, WHO 2009). A midwife must also educate parents on the hazards of smoking and consuming alcohol.

The midwife’s function before conception is to assist a woman in preparing her body for the physiological components of pregnancy. This might imply more help for women who have pre-existing medical issues including diabetes, epilepsy, hypertension, or heart disease. With pre-existing medical conditions, it’s critical to get the mother’s body in the best shape possible so she can carry a foetus to term.

The goal for a diabetic woman, for example, is to achieve normaglycaemia before becoming pregnant. Insulin should be given to women with type 2 diabetes before conception and throughout pregnancy (Jovanovic, Peterson, and Fuhrmann 2008). A midwife caring for an epileptic woman strives to keep her seizure-free while using the simplest medication. Both oral hypoglycemic medicines and anticonvulsants have been linked to teratogenic consequences (Chillemi and Vazquez 2008).

Because not all pregnancies are intended, preconception care is not commonly available. Although it is impossible to provide care guidance preconceptually after conception, it is excellent practice for a midwife to give advice to a postnatal woman for future pregnancies (Burden and Jones 2009). From my own personal experience, the majority of women seek preconceptional assistance at their doctors’ offices. This might be due to the fact that it is simpler to see a doctor by appointment; few people are aware that midwives can be contacted directly prior to pregnancy.

The 2010 Maternity Act aims to alter that. If they get their contraception from a family planning center, many women talk about becoming pregnant and get guidance. I believe it would be more advantageous to families if midwives could provide more care prior to conception. This is because if the same midwife provided care throughout the preconception, antenatal, and postpartum stages, the continuity of care would be better.

The Role of the Midwife in the Antenatal State

Routine prenatal care should be initiated after a pregnancy has been confirmed (NICE 2008). Antenatal care refers to the care given to a pregnant woman and her family from conception through the start of labor (Vicars 2003). Families must be supported as a unit during the pregnancy. It’s crucial to figure out how active a family wants to be, and the midwife should make it happen.

Many women hear about poor pregnancy and birthing experiences from others; it is important to listen to the families’ and women’s concerns in order to put them at rest. Pregnancy is meant to be a fun time for everyone involved. The manner care is normally provided and the habits of families have an impact on this.

The physical and hormonal changes that a woman may go through may create discomfort if she or her family are not prepared; for example, morning sickness or other mild pregnancy problems can be concerning and have a significant family effect. Midwives must provide support and assistance when appropriate, but they must also emphasize the significance of a referral if anything is odd.

Booking the lady refers to the first and most important second appointment a woman gets. This is an essential visit with the lady because you may provide her with useful information regarding her pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum experience (NICE 2008). It is critical to identify those women who may need special care throughout this booking time (NICE 2008). This is due to the fact that midwives are independent practitioners who are responsible for the safety of the women and unborn infants under their care.

At the booking session, the midwife is responsible for measuring height and weight and calculating the maternal BMI. Midwives must also take blood pressure readings and screen urine for abnormalities like proteinuria. This must be correctly reported. Because midwives are specialists in the normal, it is their job to identify risk factors that might alter the pregnancy and its result. This includes pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, and the possibility of a genetic disorder.

Following that, the midwife will recommend you to the proper experts. Rule 6 of the Midwifery Rules and Standards is followed (NMC 2004). It’s also crucial to learn about the client’s family and medical background. This is to determine if the baby or the mother are at any particular risk. We are also responsible for gathering any prior surgery information. This is to find out whether there are any diseases or surgeries that might make pregnancy more difficult (NICE 2008).

It is essential to provide all pertinent information about screening for any anomalies during the scheduling appointment. A midwife is a facilitator and educator for pregnant women; it’s critical that the lady and her family have all of the information they need about any operations or testing so they can make an educated decision (Baston and Hall 2009).

It is the duty of the midwives to guarantee that this occurs. Blood tests are available to confirm the mother’s blood types, rhesus D status, hepatitis B status, HIV, rubella, asymptomatic microorganisms, and any other abnormalities. It’s also crucial to track down any women who have undergone genital mutilation (NICE 2008).

In addition, the midwife must provide Down’s syndrome screening, as well as early scans to determine gestational age and ultrasound screening for structural defects. (2008, NICE). Screening tests may be an emotional experience for families, especially if one or both members of the family have a history of genetic abnormalities.

Parents may be aware that they both have a characteristic like sickle cell anemia or thalassaemia, which may cause a lot of stress for everyone in the family. A midwife’s counsel and information must be ethical. It is unethical for midwives to advise a family with a trait that their kid is at the same or lower risk as families who do not have the trait.

The information gathered during the booking appointments is often used to determine whether a woman is at a high or low risk of difficulties throughout her pregnancy or labor. This enables the appropriate care to be provided and the appropriate care route to be followed (NICE 2008). If required, multivitamins and vitamin D are administered. (2008, NICE). Vitamin K information will be provided.

Urinalysis is required at each prenatal checkup to identify any abnormalities in urine. This is a critical method for finding abnormalities early on. At each consultation, blood pressure and abdominal checks will be performed. During the first and second trimesters, the height of the fundus is measured to check that proper growth progress is being achieved (NICE 2008).

The measures from the fundus to the symphysis pubis must be plotted on a graph starting at 28 weeks. This is to guarantee that the growth is visible. The baby’s lie and posture should also be observed at this time. It is the job of the midwife to encourage normal vaginal births’ (Royal College of Midwives 2010).

It’s also important to find out whether the woman has undergone any psychiatric or mental health therapy since this will help midwives provide the care she needs and identify any risks for prenatal or postnatal depression. In addition to prenatal courses, it is critical to offer information on the baby’s growth during the pregnancy and to discuss feeding goals. A midwife must empower her clients and make it possible for them to make their own choices about their care. (2008, NICE).

Because midwives play such an important role in eliminating health inequities, they may provide guidance on maternity benefits at this early stage (Asthana and Halliday 2006). Healthy moms have healthy infants, according to the Department of Health (2008). Infant mortality is lower among newborns born to people from higher socioeconomic strata (Acheson 1998).

We are expected to provide smoking cessation programs and encourage healthy lifestyles as midwives. In addition, we must recognize disadvantaged populations and work to minimize any inequality that may exist. All of this is aimed at lowering neonatal and infant mortality and morbidity (Henderson 2005).

Multiparous women get seven prenatal appointments, whereas nulliparous women receive 10. (NICE 2008). This is based on the fact that there are no variances in the pregnancies that we would consider typical. If a midwife believes a woman needs additional visits for particular reasons, she will include them in her plan of care.

It is up to the midwife to assess if a woman needs special care for her own or the unborn baby’s welfare (NICE 2008). Multiparous women, in my opinion, should be given the same number of visits as nulliparous women; just because it is not a woman’s first child does not imply that she is immune to the fears of pregnancy and delivery, especially if her past experiences have been poor.

Every appointment should have a clear goal and organization. It’s critical for women to feel at ease with their midwives in order to get the best possible care. If a woman does not trust her midwife, she may omit critical information out of shame or simply because she does not feel comfortable revealing sensitive facts. This might put both herself and the baby in grave danger (Baston and Hall 2009). It is critical for a midwife to be able to communicate well and to listen attentively (Nursing and Midwifery Council 2008).

This is especially true when talking about lifestyle choices with women and their families. It is vital for a woman to share accurate information with her midwife; some women are afraid or embarrassed to reveal smoking or alcohol intake. This is why, as midwives, we must maintain a professional demeanor and refrain from passing judgment on our patients. Building strong connections with women is important in order for them to feel empowered in their choices, even if they have been given an educated option (NICE 2008).

To identify probable risk factors that may affect the mother or her baby, it is critical to examine lifestyle choices such as smoking, alcohol use, medicine, narcotics, domestic violence, and sexual health (Fraser and Nolan 2004). Health may be seen as a comprehensive notion that encompasses all aspects of well-being (Dunkley 2000 A). Midwives must take into account all elements of health while providing care to their customers. In his hierarchy of needs, Maslow (1954) depicts all aspects of human wants. As midwives, we must examine this and ensure that all of our customers’ requirements are satisfied.

Antenatal education is very vital for all women, regardless of gravida or parity. All members of the family should be actively involved in preparing for the baby’s delivery as part of good midwifery care. This is why prenatal education may be provided to all members of the family to help them make informed decisions for their infant and to teach them how to do so in the future (Dunkley 2000 B).

During the prenatal period, a midwife must ensure that the relevant educational information is supplied at the appropriate time. By 36 weeks of pregnancy, according to NICE guidelines (2008), all women should be supplied information about breastfeeding and support groups, as well as information on all newborn screening. It is also proper practice to provide guidance on how to prepare the client for labor and delivery, including help with completing a birth plan.

It is critical to educate women on how to recognize active labor and offer vital information on Vitamin K prophylaxis so that they may make an educated decision. It is unacceptable to wait until the lady is in labor before informing her. By 36 weeks, all midwives should be able to provide postnatal self-care advice as well as knowledge on the ‘baby blues’ and postnatal depression. This is to prepare the ladies ahead of time so that they are aware of what to anticipate (NICE 2008).

Most pregnant women, based on personal experience, are willing to take prenatal instruction from a variety of sources. Women and midwives often get instructional guidance from health care experts such as physicians, health visitors, and physiotherapists. The National Childbirth Trust, hypnobirthing providers, peer groups, La Leche, and online organizations such as net moms may also give prenatal information to pregnant people. The midwife must be able to provide guidance on credible and accurate sources of information that are easily accessible.

It is critical to recognize and appreciate a woman’s competence and life experience, as well as those of her family or support network. Each woman and her pregnancy are unique. I believe that multiparous women might benefit from refresher parent craft programs rather than nulliparous women attending the same sessions.

The goal of birthing education is to increase parents’ confidence and self-esteem so that they can make educated decisions. Parents who have received childbirth education are better equipped to interact with health care providers. (2004, Nolan) As midwives, we must encourage women’s knowledge of their own emotions, bodies, and needs, as well as prepare women, their partners, and their families for these requirements. Antenatal education should inspire parents to take charge of their own health and that of their children. As midwives, we must also cultivate good perceptions of identity in order for parents’ experiences to be beneficial (Nolan 2004).

Women’s relatives may be a valuable source of support, therefore include them in all parts of care that the woman feels comfortable with is critical. Every member of a family is affected by having a baby, which is why it is critical to prepare everyone for the changes that a newborn brings. Classes for expectant dads are a terrific way to be ready and understand what their partner is going through. There have been compelling arguments for establishing innovative approaches to give prenatal sessions that place more emphasis on dads (Walsh 2006).

Identifying the Roles and Responsibilities of a Midwife
A Midwife Communicating with a Patient

A midwife must be able to interact professionally and openly with her clients. Midwives must communicate with women’s family members as well as other members of the multidisciplinary team in this manner. A midwife must be attentive to her customers’ needs and speak honestly and freely with them, enabling the lady to feel at ease and forming a supporting network. Midwives must also be able to assert the woman as a person and give the specialized care she needs (NICE 2008).

A midwife must also have a high level of intuition and be able to recognize when women are displaying distressing behaviors that aren’t always expressed vocally (Henderson and Jones 1997). This is why I believe midwifery practice benefits from continuity of care. A connection is formed when a woman has the same midwife throughout her prenatal treatment, which means the midwife is more likely to notice if the client is feeling down or unwell. With a midwife, she knows and trusts, the lady is more inclined to share her worries.

When speaking, a midwife’s tone and attitude are crucial, as are her listening abilities. Midwives are to give emotional and psychological support that is appropriate for each family’s socioeconomic conditions; this enables women and their families to share their experiences, which may help midwives improve their work (Magill- Cuerden 2006).

Conclusion

The midwife’s duties and functions in providing care preconceptually and throughout the prenatal period have been detailed in this assignment. It has also illustrated the individuality of each pregnancy and how a midwife’s job adjusts to offer the care required. I’ve expressed my dissatisfaction with the number of prenatal consultations available and the manner in which care is provided before conception.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. What are nursing interventions during the first stage of labor?

A Midwife Communicating with a Patient
Pre-conceptual State 

The pre-conception job of the midwife is to acquire history from the prospective parents and evaluate whether any difficulties might impair a woman’s or couple’s reproductive health. They may also evaluate the holistic variables that might influence a pregnancy. When required, the midwife should provide guidance; however, this must be done with respect to the requirements of the person (Henderson and Macdonald 2004).

2. What is the meaning of antenatal care?

Antenatal care refers to the care given to a pregnant woman and her family from conception through the start of labor (Vicars 2003). Families must be supported as a unit during the pregnancy. It’s crucial to figure out how active a family wants to be, and the midwife should make it happen.

3. What is the purpose of the booking appointment?

Booking the lady refers to the first and most important second appointment a woman gets. This is an essential visit with the lady because you may provide her with useful information regarding her pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum experience (NICE 2008). It is critical to identify those women who may need special care throughout this booking time (NICE 2008). This is due to the fact that midwives are independent practitioners who are responsible for the safety of the women and unborn infants under their care.

4. Why is learning about pregnancy important?

Antenatal education is very vital for all women, regardless of gravida or parity. All members of the family should be actively involved in preparing for the baby’s delivery as part of good midwifery care. This is why prenatal education may be provided to all members of the family to help them make informed decisions for their infant and to teach them how to do so in the future (Dunkley 2000 B).

Identifying the Roles and Responsibilities of a Midwife

 

 

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