What is Mental Health Health And Social Care; Definition of Mental Health, Definition of Mental Illness, and Challenges of Mental Health Patients’ Wellbeing.

Mental Health Health And Social Care

This study guide is about mental health and social care. Use it to create excellent educational essays on psychiatric health and social care.

Introduction

Due to the strict confidentiality requirements for patient records, especially in cases involving mental health and illness, both mental health patients and the general public were assured, in accordance with the nursing and midwifery council code of conduct (NMC 2008), that mental health patients’ rights to confidentiality would be respected and observed. Furthermore, any information gathered about individuals as part of this study was not shared or released with/to any other parties without their explicit consent (Mental health and learning disabilities 1998).

Definition of Mental Health

What is mental health?

The World Health Organization (2001) defines health as the condition of being cognitively, emotionally, socially, physically, and psychologically healthy, rather than just the absence of illness. However, according to Keyes (2002), mental health does not relate to a single instance of an individual’s state of mind, but rather encompasses a wide range and depicts a pattern of behavior over time. It may be stated in basic terms, and the idea is that different bodies, surroundings, and situations conceptualize the word differently.

To put it another way, what is considered mental health in one profession or society may not be the same in another. It may be defined as the disconcerting fortitude that enables people to enjoy their lives while enduring pain, anguish, and despair. It can also be considered a favorable indicator of people’s interests and a crucial concept in our own and others’ lives (Weare 2000).

In certain circumstances, defining what mental health is may include a wide range of abilities that emphasizes our capacity for development, transformation, and social interaction (Department of Health 1995a). There are a variety of mental health conditions that may lead to impairment, including anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia (web 1).

The World Health Organization (WHO) published a study in 2003 that highlighted how covert and hidden shame and favoritism related to mental health has existed emphasizing the need to discover and put into the public sphere means of reducing stigma. The pain and difficulty that individuals, families, and communities face as a result of disability and expenditure is immense. In the past several years, the rest of the globe has realized the enormity of the problem and the potential risk that the sickness poses.

The findings from the report revealed startling statistics from throughout the globe on the disease, whose significance was frequently disregarded. Surprisingly, around 450 million people suffer from mental or behavioral issues. Each year, about one million people commit suicide, with neuropsychiatric illnesses accounting for four of the six primary causes of years spent disabled (depression, alcoholism, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder).

Mental illness affects at least one out of every four families, and families are often the primary caregivers for people with mental illnesses. The extent of the strain on the family is a consequence of the difficulties that come with providing care. Mentally ill people face both social and mental health expenses, as well as discrimination, human rights violations, stigmatization, and internal and outward dejection (WHO 2003).

Definition of Mental Illness

What is mental illness?

This occurs when the mind’s functioning is disrupted as a result of a succession of symptoms and experiences associated with diseases such as phobias, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, mania, and drug abuse disorders (Carol and ASH 2004, health welfare 1998, Trent 1999, Tudor 1996). Because of how prevalent and widespread mental disorders have grown in recent years, it is probable that an ordinary person may either acquire a mental health condition or come into direct touch with someone who does (Kitchener and Jorm 2002).

According to a study performed in Scotland, one out of every four individuals would suffer from mental illness at some point in their life (Scottish Association for Mental Health) (2003a). Mental diseases have been stigmatized in various countries and cultures, according to Weiss et al (2001). According to recent studies, several nations have attempted to reduce the degree of stigmatization using scientific approaches and educational activities (Rahman et al 1998).

Despite these efforts, the stigma and fear associated with mental illness continue to be a significant barrier to getting help to detect and treat it. The relationship of stigmatization with mental illness has resulted in inequities when compared to other types of diseases, as well as human rights violations for persons with these disorders.

Although mental health and mental illness are not synonymous, they are intertwined and are therefore often used interchangeably (World Health Organization 2003). Mental health refers to how people think, feel, and act as they go about their everyday lives. It aids in determining how individuals deal with stress, interact with others, and make decisions. Mental illness, on the other hand, is a wide word encompassing a variety of mental diseases, and mental disorders are physical problems that cause discomfort and/or reduced functioning by disrupting how a person thinks, feels, and/or behaves (Austin 2010).

Challenges of Mental Health Patients’ Wellbeing

What limits the well-being of mental health patients?

Patients with mental disabilities face a variety of challenges in their daily lives, including reactions to changes (normal responses to external situations); either short or long-term disability linked to signs of hopelessness and nervousness (and psychiatrically linked with diagnoses such as gloominess, but may be broadly constructed); bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and other mental illnesses (with an obvious genetics root, more simply clear by its signs but also with important the general public meaning and penalty).

There may be coexistence between them, as well as difficulties related to the use of alcohol or drugs, as well as issues arising from complex features and personality types (The Royal College of General Practitioners 2007). Ms. Catherine, who suffers from postpartum depression, was the subject of the case study below.

Case Scenario – Ms. Catherine suffers from postpartum depression

Brief Description

“Postpartum” depression is a type of depression that happens to women after they give birth and they are of two different categories which are postpartum or maternity “blues,” a calm frame of mind problem of the minimum period, and “postpartum chief depression”, a painful and likely life-damaging illness of a longer duration. The Postpartum blues affect between 50%-80% of new mothers after labor and symptoms are normally begin from 3 to 4 days after delivery, getting worse by days 5 upwards, and may be likely to leave the mother away by the 12th day.

The new mother could either have mood swings with periods of weeping, irritability, interspersed and nervous stimulations, or with situations of feeling well; and she may have difficulty sleeping. If the signs continue for more than 2 weeks, it is essential to look for medical assistance (Moline et al 2001).

On the other hand, the starting of “Postpartum major depression” could be at any period in the initial periods after giving birth and is extremely intense than postpartum blues. It is the change in the brain chemistry that causes it and leads to mood disorder; a genetic illness that does not happen by the fault of the mother or the consequence of a “weak” or unsound personality.

Medically there are professional treatments since it is treatable and curable. Postpartum depression has major symptoms such as a dejected atmosphere throughout the day, almost every time, for not less than 2 weeks, and loss of interest in activities that were enjoyable before. Other signs involve tiredness, feeling fidgety or slowed, losing a common sense of guilt or insignificance, complicatedness in concentration, sleeplessness, and persistent belief in death or suicide (Moline et al 2001).

Detailed Analysis- Ms. Catherine`s story

Ms. Catherine’s story started one day when she came home from the hospital with her beautiful baby daughter after delivery, but her world began to fall apart. She was hit by intense nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, dehydration, and fainting. Breastfeeding her baby became out of question. Every time she held her baby to her breast, she needed to quickly lay her back down so she could run to the bathroom.

In the course of the first 3 months of her daughter’s life, she was hospitalized twice, removed from her children including the newly born. She was completely changed from a very strong, vibrant, healthy, and physically active person to something else, unable to carry out even the simplest daily responsibilities. She became devastated and a failure as a mom and couldn’t even get out of bed where she even wanted to die.

During her second hospital stay, a nurse gently suggested that she might have postpartum depression but was stunned. How could the horrible gastrointestinal symptoms she was experiencing be caused by depression? She however understood how she could be depressed because of the sickness she was suffering from, but not the other way around. She had never heard of postpartum depression.

She took the suggestion to heart and quickly sought diagnosis information, and help. In the process started taking an antidepressant and also immediately began seeing a psychologist for therapy. Ms. Catherine showed signs of recovery but has always wanted someone around her to assist her in her daily routine duties.

My Encounter with Ms. Catherine

I found it difficult in interacting with and responding to Ms. Catherine initially because little did I know about mothers suffering from postpartum depression after giving birth. But later on, I realized that it is a common mental illness problem that affects most women after childbirth. Immediately afterward my attitude and behavior towards her changed and I begin to interact with her freely.

The instant recognition of Ms. Catherine’s ill health changed my thoughts, attitude, belief, and perception of people with mental disabilities and the need to assist them to cope with their everyday life. Ms. Catherine’s behavioral practices are sometimes more strange than normal with her consistent ineffectiveness coupled with her cold attitude and responsiveness regarding what ought to be routinely practiced.

It is therefore imperative that patients with mental disabilities are treated and dealt with according to their specific circumstances since this helps in addressing their individual concerns effectively. One of the weaknesses I had was to get closer to people who suffer from mental-related illnesses but I came to realize that my fear of not wanting to approach people with mental disabilities because of how they can be aggressive sometimes has changed drastically. As a consequence, I have now been able to build on my strengths in terms of always giving a helping hand to patients and moving on to people whose mental well-being has been challenged.

Conclusion

Mental Health Health And Social Care
A list of Mental Diseases

It has become clear to me that mental diseases constitute a severe hazard and do significant harm in our everyday lives. There is no denying that mental diseases come in a variety of forms and severity levels. Depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar mood disorder, personality disorders, and eating disorders were among the principal categories found.

However, anxiety and depressive disorders are the most common mental diseases, so it’s not unexpected that the case study above focused on postpartum depression. Even though most people experience feelings of intense anxiety, panic, or depression from time to time, a mental illness is only recognized when these symptoms become so concerning and debilitating that people find it difficult to go about their daily routines, such as working, relaxing, and maintaining relationships.

More attention has to be paid to the ailment because failing to overlook its presence might result in a possible calamity and more fatalities. The decision by the global health organization to name a day “world mental health day” is significant and must be respected by all with mindfulness of the great advantages it will produce for us.

The expense of treating and caring for mentally sick individuals grows as the days go by as opposed to the amount of engagement in stopping the illness from arising. The efforts of health and social care workers throughout the years have been tremendous and thus need to continue in order to prevent, decrease and even further eliminate the pandemic. It must nevertheless be highlighted that the condition is avoidable and even curable therefore do not die in quiet because “the issue shared, is the problem solved”.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. What defines mental health?

The World Health Organization (2001) defines health as the condition of being cognitively, emotionally, socially, physically, and psychologically healthy, rather than just the absence of illness. However, according to Keyes (2002), mental health does not relate to a single instance of an individual’s state of mind, but rather encompasses a wide range and depicts a pattern of behavior over time. It may be stated in basic terms, and the idea is that different bodies, surroundings, and situations conceptualize the word differently.

2. What defines mental illness?

Mental Health Health And Social Care
A nurse tending to a mentally ill patient

Mental illness, on the other hand, is a wide word encompassing a variety of mental diseases, and mental disorders are physical problems that cause discomfort and/or reduced functioning by disrupting how a person thinks, feels, and/or behaves (Austin 2010).

3. What are the challenges in mental health?

Patients with mental disabilities face a variety of challenges in their daily lives, including reactions to changes (normal responses to external situations); either short or long-term disability linked to signs of hopelessness and nervousness (and psychiatrically linked with diagnoses such as gloominess, but may be broadly constructed); bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and other mental illnesses (with an obvious genetics root, more simply clear by its signs but also with important the general public meaning and penalty).

References

Austin, (2010) Psychiatric and mental health nursing for Canadian practice, Medicine series; Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, edition 2 revised, ISBN 0781795931, 9780781795937

Brug, J., Lechner, L., De Vries, H. (1995a) “Psychosocial Determinants of fruit and vegetable consumption”, Appetite, Vol. 25 No.3, pp.285-96.

Carol, B. and ASH, S. (2004) Tobacco and Mental Health, Scotland; available at http://www.ashscotland.org.uk/ash/files/tobacco%20and%20mental%20health.pdf

Centre for Health Promotion (1997) Proceedings from the International Workshop on Mental Health Promotion; 1997 Toronto, University of Toronto.

Keyes, C. L. M. (2002) “From languishing to flourishing in life” The mental health continuum: “, Journal of Health and Social Behavior No 43.

Kitchener, B. and Jorm, A. (2002) Mental Health First Aid Manual Centre for Mental Health Research, The Australian National University.

Mental Health and Learning Disabilities (1998) a guide to working with vulnerable clients, Guidelines for mental health and learning disabilities nursing, Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting.

Ministry of Supply and Services (1988) Mental health for Canadians, Health and Welfare Canada: striking a balance. Ottawa: Canada.

Rahman, A., Mubbashar, M., Gater, R. and Goldberg, D. (1998) “Randomised Trial of Impact of School Mental Health Programme in Rural Rawalpindi, Pakistan.” Lancet 352 (9133): 1022-25.

Royal College of General Practitioners (2007) Care of People with Mental Health Problems, Curriculum Statement 13

Scottish Executive (2004a) Health in Scotland Edinburgh: Scottish Executive Available at http://www.scotland.gov.uk/library5/health/his03-03.asp.

Trent, D. (1992) The promotion of mental health fallacies of current thinking, Promotion of mental health; 2:562.

Tudor, K. (1996) paradigms and practice, Mental health promotion: London: Rout ledge.

Weare, K. (2000) A whole-school approach, Promoting mental, emotional and social health:. London: RoutledgeFalmer.

Weiss, M. G., Jadhav, S., Raguram, S., Vounatsou, P. and Littlewood, R. (2001) Anthropology and Medicine, “Psychiatric Stigma across Cultures: Local Validation in Bangalore and London” 8 (1): 71-87.

World Health Organization (1975) Sixteenth Report of the WHO Expert Committee on Mental Health, Organization of Mental Health Services in Developing Countries: Technical Report Series 564, WHO, Geneva.

Web 1= (www.mind.org.uk) Accessed 21- 05-2010

Web3= http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/depression/mentalhealthprofessionals_000358.htm Accessed 12- 06- 2010

Mental Health Health And Social Care

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