Role of Communication in Nursing

Role of Communication in Nursing

This study guide focuses on the role of communication in nursing. Use it to create excellent educational essays on communication and its significance in nursing practice.

Introduction to Role of Communication in Nursing Essay

Communication is the exchange of data between individuals. Communication is critical for nurses in the current environment, and it is a  critical component of the nursing practice, which has a unique significance. Nurses employ effective communication skills to earn the confidence of patients and to acquire a more complete understanding of them. This kind of communication is beneficial for doing nursing assessments and developing care plans and is even more beneficial for conducting health education.

To accomplish the goal of promoting patients’ early recovery, effective communication can foster a positive relationship between nurses and patients, ensuring that patients receive the best possible treatment for psychological adjustment. Effective communication between nurses and patients in clinical care has the potential to perform the function of surgery that drugs cannot. This essay will begin by discussing the critical nature of a nurse’s communication ability; it will then analyze both verbal and non-verbal communication in nursing.

The significance of a nurse’s ability to communicate

Why is a nurses’ communication ability important?

Nurse-patient communication is the interchange of information between nurses and patients, as well as their families, and it refers to the interaction between nurses and patients (Jane, 2010). With the evolution of the medical paradigm, nurse-patient communication has been a source of worry for an increasing number of individuals. Thus, the content of communication between nurses and patients is critical; effective communication between nurses and patients can alleviate the needs of patients who are in pain or suffering; it can also promote understanding and support between nurses and patients, which has the effect of improving care needs.

Nurse-patient communication fosters and strengthens mutual understanding, trust, and commitment to the nurse-patient relationship. Additionally, nurses may interact with patients to ascertain and address the demands of the patient’s negative emotions; hence, efficient communication increases the quality of treatment, acting as a catalytic factor. Prior to and after communication therapy, patients had a psychological load of 99.14 percent and 21.57 percent, respectively (Clare, 2009). That situation made it abundantly evident that there was effective communication between the therapies of patients suffering from unfavourable emotional effects.

70% of clinical diagnostic information comes from the patient’s medical history; additional studies have revealed that capable and competent medical staff can obtain 82 percent of clinical diagnostic information from the patient’s medical history, 9 percent from the physical examination, and 9 percent from laboratory results (Jane, 2010). The study’s findings indicate that it is critical to improve health care professionals’ communication abilities. Through the use of adequate communication skills, health care workers may gather information and a comprehensive medical history of patients. They can generate reliable medical history information, which is crucial for proper illness diagnosis.

Communication skills between nurse and patient

How do nurse-patient communication skills promote care?

The nurse plays a critical role in patient communication. Clinical nurses are constantly interacting with patients at various levels of care. Communication between nurses and patients is critical in the rehabilitation of patients. Verbal and non-verbal communication, communication between nurses and patients throughout the mutual penetration process, and communication between nurses and patients when combined play a big role in promoting care (Clare, 2009).

Verbal Communication Skills of Nurses

What is the importance of verbal communication skills in promoting care?

In the clinical nursing process, language has the potential to both heal and create illness. Nurses have the greatest interaction with patients (Clare, 2009). Communication between nurses and patients concerning patients’ physical and mental conditions is critical in order to comprehend patients, deliver accurate information to patients, alleviate patient pain and suffering, and increase effectiveness. This is a significant advancement.

Throughout the nurse’s career, the nurse should utilize readable language and suitable vocabulary to communicate their thoughts and make others understand in order to interchange ideas and sentiments (Jane, 2010). Nurse-patient communication should be purposeful, subject-oriented, and theme-driven.

Nurses should be skilled in guiding and controlling the conversation’s environment, substance, and procedures, so that patients experience decreased stress and emotional stability, avoid simplistic, ruthless, and cold language, and gain confidence in their capacity to conquer the sickness. Meanwhile, the wording should be straightforward, without adding additional attributes to the adjective, and as close to common speech as feasible. Nurses’ words, in particular, should exhibit kindness, protection, explanation, and comfort.

Nurses should infuse their words with emotion during nurse-patient communication. This is dependent on the nurse’s emotional control and management (Mary, 2011). When the nurse enters the work state, they should intentionally modify their emotions to a pleasant and tranquil condition, in order to automatically develop sympathy for the patient, trust, and respect for the patient’s sentiments and emotions. Nurses assess their communication abilities and emotional attractiveness.

In general, the voice was soft and some had a gentler tone, the discourse was slower, and the gestures and facial expressions were acceptable, demonstrating the gentle nurses’ care for patients and worries. While verbal communication is important, stillness allows patients to reflect. Consider the consequences of the patient experience, comprehend and accept the communication process’s ability to convey the true meaning of the patient.

Nurses’ Nonverbal Communication Abilities

How do nonverbal communication skills facilitate proper patient care?

Non-verbal modes of communication are employed by around 60% to 70% of persons in everyday communication (Mary, 2011). According to some, non-verbal communication is more successful than verbal communication under typical conditions, and the two modes of communication have the same impact. Non-verbal communication has a strong expressive and seductive quality, and the information is often richer than the words used to communicate across language boundaries.

Non-verbal communication is often referred to as “acts of language,” and it is characterized by the use of facial gestures, eye contact, and movement to accomplish communication goals (Jane, 2010), ranging from language to increase communication and counselling roles. Often, acting language may explain what words cannot, and can accurately represent the manner, bearing, and demeanour of care professionals thus boosting communication efficacy.

Role of Communication in Nursing
A nurse smiling for a patient

Smiling may help establish an intimate setting for patients in nursing and can help patients and their families feel relaxed (Jane, 2010). For instance, when the patient awoke in the early morning, a cheerful nurse approached the bed, almost as if to inquire. Good morning, eradicating the oddity of patients’ nurses. By providing patients with a grin, they will develop the confidence necessary to fight the sickness. According to statistics, language accounts for 7% of the entire influence of information transmission and exchange, tone accounts for 38%, and facial expression accounts for 35% (Constance, 2008).

Nurses should interact with patients with a smile, conveying a sense of kindness and warmth while also reducing the sense of separation between nurses and patients. Body language is a kind of nonverbal communication that complements spoken communication. Non-verbal expression is significant because it embodies a very powerful function of verbal information expression and is colourful.

Body language is a term that refers to how individuals communicate with one another by gestures, motions, posture, or gestures that touch in order to transmit information, express sentiments, and attitudes (Audrey, 2001). Nurses may assist to build patient trust via effective use of body language communication. When patients with a high fever are asked about their health they touch the forehead to better portray their worries, kind of emotion, and to alleviate patient and family tension.

Conclusion

To summarize, nurse-patient communication is an art that requires not just nursing experience, but also comprehensive knowledge of the humanities and social sciences, as well as effective communication skills. Communication is a fundamental skill in the nursing profession. Communication between nurses and patients is achieved by the coordinated use of a number of strategies, rather than through the resolution of a single problem. Nurses-patients only learnt how to get along and how to utilize communication skills effectively in order to offer the best care possible for patients and to encourage physical and psychological rehabilitation of patients and their families.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. Why is nurse-patient communication important?

Nurse-patient communication fosters and strengthens mutual understanding, trust, and commitment to the nurse-patient relationship. Additionally, nurses may interact with patients to ascertain and address the demands of the patient’s negative emotions; hence, efficient communication increases the quality of treatment, acting as a catalytic factor.

2. Why is body language important in nonverbal communication?

Role of Communication in Nursing
A Nurse Exercising Body language communication

Body language is a term that refers to how individuals communicate with one another by gestures, motions, posture, or gestures that touch in order to transmit information, express sentiments, and attitudes (Audrey, 2001). Nurses may assist to build patient trust via effective use of body language communication. When patients with a high fever are asked about their health they touch the forehead to better portray their worries, kind of emotion, and to alleviate patient and family tension.

3. What is non-verbal communication and why is it important?

Non-verbal communication is often referred to as “acts of language,” and it is characterized by the use of facial gestures, eye contact, and movement to accomplish communication goals (Jane, 2010), ranging from language to increase communication and counselling roles. Often, acting language may explain what words cannot, and can accurately represent the manner, bearing, and demeanour of care professionals thus boosting communication efficacy.

4. Why is smiling important to a patient?

Smiling may help establish an intimate setting for patients in nursing and can help patients and their families feel relaxed (Jane, 2010). For instance, when the patient awoke in the early morning, a cheerful nurse approached the bed, almost as if to inquire. Good morning, eradicating the oddity of patients’ nurses. By providing patients with a grin, they will develop the confidence necessary to fight the sickness.

 

Role of Communication in Nursing

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