Social Models of Health and Social Care Essay

Social Models of Health and Social Care

This study guide is about social models of health and social care. Study it to gather knowledge that will help in developing the perfect essay concerning the social models of health.

Introduction

The social model of health and health definitions will be defined in this essay, which will take into account social health aspects and influences on the social model of health. The primary conclusions of this investigation will be presented in a summary, which will cast doubt on the social model of health’s current efficiency.

What is the Social Model of Health?

The social model of health seeks to improve individual and community well-being and health by assessing the circumstances of social and environmental health causes, as well as biological and medical factors (Quipps, 2011), at both the local and national levels, in order to eliminate health inequalities. Social, personal, economic, and environmental concerns (Ottewill and Wall, 2004, p. 14) present in class, ethnicity, gender, social disability, and psychological health are examples of social health causes (Ottewill and Wall, 2004, p. 14).

What is health?

Health is defined by the World Health Organization as “a condition of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, rather than only the absence of sickness or disability” (Blackburn with Darwen PCT, 2012). The focus on well-being in the social model of health refers to a feeling of happiness or health (Cambridge Dictionaries Online, 2011). To achieve this, all areas of a person’s existence, including social conditions, housing, and education, must be met; health is thus multidimensional (Yurkovich and Lattergrass, 2008, pp. 439; Hilleboe, 1972, pp.139).

The impact of the social model of health and causes of social conditions are factors that can determine the perception of health conditions and the management of health needs. For example, childhood health attitudes and upbringing can determine future adult health perceptions and outcomes (Toivanen and Modin, 2011). As an instance a child may not have been encouraged to exercise and in adulthood develop related health conditions; intervention in community fitness knowledge could have reduced any further health risks.

The Impact of the Social Model of Health and Causes of Social Conditions on Health Perceptions

How does the social model of health impact health perceptions?

The influence of the social model of health and the determinants of social circumstances are aspects that can influence how people perceive health problems and how they are managed. Childhood health attitudes and upbringing, for example, can influence adult health views and outcomes (Toivanen and Modin, 2011). For example, a youngster who was not encouraged to exercise as a child may acquire linked health concerns as an adult; community fitness awareness intervention could have avoided any subsequent health risks.

Food manufacturers’ influence can also have an impact on social attitudes that affect a healthy diet, such as overeating. Advertising, food labeling and the concept of convenience foods (Naidoo & Wills, 2008, pp. 177) have all contributed to a sedentary lifestyle, which has resulted in chronic illnesses (Kirby et al., 2012, pp. 1572). This could lead to cardiac problems, diabetes, and put a strain on healthcare resources. Under the social model of health, health policy should compel food companies to provide healthier options, warn people about the dangers of unhealthy eating, and promote healthier eating as a positive state of well-being, particularly in poor communities where healthy food and food education are scarce (The Fat Nutritionist, 2012).

Social class imbalances establish social indifference of class status, reactions, and management of medical perceptions (Naidoo & Wills, 2008, pp. 111) and may influence the availability of health allocation among social classes, such as postcode lottery (WHO, 2012), potentially resulting in the deprivation of health benefits for the common people (McDougall, 2007, pp. 339). The social model of health seeks to advance well-being and reduce social class inequalities by ensuring access to health information, hospitals, clinics, health websites, and community centers for people of all social classes, ultimately leading to better health choices and lifestyles for individuals and communities (local.gov.uk, 2012).

If insufficient disability legislation makes it difficult for a person to fully participate as a productive member of society, their situation may become institutionalized. According to Silva et al., (2012) and Kizito et al., (2012), free access to health care can lower obstacles to population poor health and raise the efficacy of social well-being, allowing individuals to reach their full potential. Larson (1991, p. 2) expands on this concept in social health disability by stating that social well-being might be defined as a person’s ability to complete daily duties despite their disease.

Access to health support and knowledge can influence good health in circumstances of ethnic and social inequality. The United Kingdom is culturally diverse, with a wide range of ethnic groups, and language problems can impede understanding among these groups, potentially leading to social marginalization. Because of a lack of awareness in social health concerns, a Health Survey for England indicated that black and minority groups are the most likely to become ill (Postnote, 2007, p.1).

Social Models of Health and Social Care
Social Care

To reduce health risks and increase social well-being, the social model of health would recommend that health facilities and information be presented and made accessible in a way that can be received and understood by people of various ethnic groups. Minority mental health disparities have previously been underrepresented; however, the social model of health recognizes that social health services should address minority cultural and socioeconomic background difficulties in order to provide adequate health treatment and create a sense of well-being (Aisenberg, 2008, pp. 297).

Seedhouse (1988), as referenced by Ottewill and Wall (2004), indicated that providing adequate “food, shelter, and warmth” (p 4) can also contribute to a sense of well-being and improved health, thus fostering a sense of security. Seedhouse expands on this concept by defining an individual’s health as a function of the circumstances in their environment, which may alter their ability to attain goals based on their biological and mental capacities.

As a critic of medical explanations for the improvements in mortality rates between 1850 and 1970, Thomas McKeown investigates living conditions further, concluding that health improvements were a result of better living conditions and nutrition (Department for Health and Aging, 2008), a foundation for social well-being. In 1980, the Black Report concluded that health inequities in the lower social strata were caused by poor housing and sanitary conditions, which led to unhealthy lifestyles (Maguire, N. D.).

As earnings become more evenly distributed, lower income may encourage poor living conditions (Kawachi, 1997), and prolonged economic situations might have an impact on health (Watts, 2000). Women’s and men’s health can be affected by their socioeconomic situation as a result of economic opportunity and wealth (Ballantyne, 1999). To provide equal health, the social model of health would focus on minimizing wage discrepancies.

Conclusion

Social Models of Health and Social Care Essay
The Social Model of Health

Social health determinants can have a substantial impact on a person’s physical, mental, and social well-being, allowing them to reach their full potential. The social model of health recognizes the benefits of improved living conditions, lifestyle choices, food, and access to care as a component in achieving good health.

Social well-being, in particular, draws attention to reducing social inequalities and promoting a healthy society, while also challenging government and businesses to adapt to different service users and ensure they are not harmed by their illness.

In terms of evaluation, the social model of health is not diverse enough, and it could benefit from broadening in conjunction with medical concepts, as well as pushing harder for inequalities to be recognized in a society where poverty is common and health care practices are ignored in hospitals and other care settings.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. What are the examples of social models of health?

Social, personal, economic, and environmental concerns (Ottewill and Wall, 2004, p. 14) present in class, ethnicity, gender, social disability, and psychological health are examples of social health causes (Ottewill and Wall, 2004, p. 14).

2. Why is the social model of health important?

The social model of health seeks to improve individual and community well-being and health by assessing the circumstances of social and environmental health causes, as well as biological and medical factors (Quipps, 2011), at both the local and national levels, in order to eliminate health inequalities.

3. What do we mean by health?

Health is defined by the World Health Organization as “a condition of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, rather than only the absence of sickness or disability” (Blackburn with Darwen PCT, 2012).

4. How do income and social status affect health?

As earnings become more evenly distributed, lower income may encourage poor living conditions (Kawachi, 1997), and prolonged economic situations might have an impact on health (Watts, 2000). Social class imbalances establish social indifference of class status, reactions, and management of medical perceptions (Naidoo & Wills, 2008, pp. 111) and may influence the availability of health allocation among social classes, such as postcode lottery (WHO, 2012), potentially resulting in the deprivation of health benefits for the common people (McDougall, 2007, pp. 339).

Social Models of Health and Social Care

 

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